7 SharePoint 2013 Upgrade Tools You Can’t Live Without

Published by on February 13th, 2013

SharePoint 2013 Upgrades in a Nutshell

In this third article of the “SharePoint 2013 Upgrades in a Nutshell” series, we ‘ll provide an overview of the new Site Collection Health Check Rules and how they help ensure successful SharePoint site collection upgrades.

The site collection health checks have 7 predefined rules which are automatically run when you request an upgrade of your site collection through the UI:

  • Conflicting Content Types
  • Customized Files
  • Missing Galleries
  • Missing Parent Content Types
  • Missing Site Templates
  • Unsupported Language Pack References
  • Unsupported MUI references

You can also run the health checks from the Site Collection Settings menu.

New Site Collection Health Checks and Upgrade options for Administrators

New Site Collection Health Checks and Upgrade options for Administrators

When you click on “Site collection health checks” you’ll be brought to this screen:

Prepare to run site collection health checks screen

Prepare to run site collection health checks screen

You’ll then be taken to the results screen to see a report of each check:

Site Collection Health Check Report

Site Collection Health Check Report

When you click on “Tell me more” you’re greeted with a popup which has more information about the rule and how to resolve any failures.  Below is a table which includes the information that you will see if you clicked on each.

(The help content is loaded from office.microsoft.com):

SharePoint Health Check Rules, Descriptions and Fixes

Conflicting content types were found during site collection health check When you run a site collection health check before upgrading to SharePoint 2013, SharePoint will check to see if there are any conflicts between existing content types and content types that are created when you upgrade the site to SharePoint 2013.A conflict occurs when both content types have the same name. To fix this issue, you need to rename the existing content type before upgrading.For the steps to rename an existing content type, see Create or customize a content type.
Customized files found during site collection health check

If your site collection contains files that have been customized using a file editor such as Microsoft SharePoint Designer or Notepad or by changing some of the file properties, these files may not work properly after you upgrade to SharePoint 2013.

When you run the pre-upgrade health check, any customized files in your site collection will show up in the health check report. Each customized file will have a link that will take you to a page where you can reset the file to the default template in the site definition. If you choose not to reset the customized file to the default template in the site definition, you should at least make a note of these files in case there are issues with them after you upgrade. You can also re-run the site collection health check after you upgrade if you run into any issues to identify any files that may be causing a problem.

To reset a customized file back to its default template:

  1. On the Site Collection Health Check Results page, locate the file that you want to reset back to the default template.
  2. Next to the file name, click Reset page to default.
  3. On the Reset Page to Site Definition Version page, select one of the following options:
  4. Reset specific page to site definition version to reset only the file selected

– or –

  1. Reset all pages in this site to site definition version to reset all customized files back to the default template in the site definition.
  2. Click Reset.

What types of customized files are affected?

Certain .aspx pages that have been modified with Microsoft SharePoint Designer, Notepad, or any other file editing software will show up in the health check results list. This includes default.aspx pages and Master pages that you may have customized outside of SharePoint. Additionally, any such files whose properties have been changed will also show up in the health checker results.

Reset a customized file to the original version

By default, all items in SharePoint are stored in the database, but some .aspx pages that are commonly used across a site or site collection are stored in the file system for performance reasons. When you customize one of these files using file editing software or modify the properties for this type of file, it is no longer stored in the file system and is now stored in the SharePoint database.

When you upgrade a site collection to SharePoint 2013, all customized files automatically revert back to the default template, all customizations in these files are lost, and they’re moved back into the file system.

Running the health check before upgrading lets you know which files in your site collection have been customized and lets you decide which files you want to revert to their default template and which ones you don’t.

Tip: We recommend that you test any file changes in an evaluation version of the site collection before upgrading.

 

 

Missing galleries found during site collection health check When you run a site collection health check before upgrading to SharePoint 2013, SharePoint will attempt to rebuild any missing galleries, such as a web part gallery, automatically. No action is necessary on your part if this succeeds.If SharePoint is unable to rebuild a missing gallery, it may mean that the gallery has become corrupted in some way. In this case, the missing galleries will be listed on the health check results page.To fix this issue, it may be necessary to contact your Farm Administrator or support and have them delete the gallery and recreate it before proceeding with the upgrade. If you have any custom data stored in the gallery, you will need to back up the data before deleting it.
Parent content types missing during site collection health check When you run a site collection health check before upgrading to SharePoint 2013, you may find that the parent for a content type is missing.To fix this issue, you will need to do one of the following:

  • Delete the orphaned content type.
  • Associate the orphaned content type with a parent content type.

For the steps to delete an orphaned content type or to associate a content type with a parent content type, see Create or customize a content type.

 

Missing site templates found during site collection health check When you run a site collection health check before upgrading to SharePoint 2013, you may find that the site template is missing for some of the sites within your site collection. There are two reasons this can happen:1.) The site template has been deleted.2.) The site template is not available in SharePoint 2013 for the language in which the site was created.To fix this issue, you’ll need to do one of the following:If you’re using SharePoint Server 2013, contact your Farm Administrator.If you’re using SharePoint Online 2013, contact support.If the missing site template isn’t available, you will need to back up your data and delete any web sites that use the missing site template and recreate them using an alternative template.
Unsupported language pack references found during site collection health check Language packs let you create sites and site collections in multiple languages without requiring you to sign up for multiple instances of Microsoft SharePoint Online.After you run the pre-upgrade site collection health check, if the health check report shows a list of sites within your site collection for which the SharePoint Online 2013 language pack is not yet available, you must wait until the language pack becomes available.After the missing language pack is present, you can upgrade your site collection to SharePoint Online 2013 provided no other errors were found during the pre-upgrade health check.
Unsupported MUI references found during site collection health check  The Multilingual User Interface (MUI) functionality in Microsoft SharePoint gives users the ability to change the language of the user interface (UI) for a website. For example, a German-speaking user who is working with an English UI can change the language of the UI to German. The site’s toolbars, navigation bars, list titles, and column headings appear in German.After you run the pre-upgrade site collection health check, if the health check report shows a list of sites within your site collection with unsupported MUI references, you will not be prevented from upgrading your site collection. You will just need to correct this issue before users will be able to view the sites within the site collection in the appropriate language.To fix this issue, do one of the following:If you’re using SharePoint Server 2013, contact your Farm Administrator to get the missing language pack installed and enable the language as an alternative language for the site.If you’re using SharePoint Online 2013, you will need to wait for the missing language pack to become available before you can enable the language as an alternative language for the site.

Also note that you can run these rules individually through PowerShell:

Test-SPSite -Identity <SiteURL> [-Rule <RuleID>] 

The Rule ID’s (a guide) can be found here.

You can then run this PowerShell to repair the faulting health checks:

Repair-SPSite -Identity <SiteURL> [-Rule <RuleID>]

As you can see, these checks provide the administrator peace of mind that the most common errors during upgrade will be avoided.  Microsoft has provided some good documentation on each of the steps, what they do, and how to fix their failures.  Until more SharePoint 2013 upgrade goodness, cheers!

References:

Run site Collection health checks in SharePoint 2013 – Technet

Site and Site Collection Management – Office.Microsoft.com (help content)

About Andy Milsark

Andy Milsark has written 44 posts in this blog.

Andy, a proud new daddy, enjoys learning as much as humanly possible about SharePoint, PowerShell, and Private Cloud Automation. When he needs a break from battling SharePoint, he can be found throwing around weights at the local Crossfit gym. Follow Andy on Google+

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  1. February 28th, 2013 at 23:09 | #1

    I have read all the comments, but I really enjoyed the article. It proved to be Very helpful to me.

  1. May 27th, 2013 at 01:22 | #1
  2. May 21st, 2014 at 09:53 | #2

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